Top Tips for Labeling Moving Boxes

When you think of moving to a new home, what words come to mind? If you’re like most who have gone through the process of a home move, you probably think of words like chaos, disorganization and stress. It’s not that moving to a new home is all bad. In fact, it can actually be a very exciting time in one’s life. The problem is that there are a lot of details involved in order to orchestrate and conduct a move. From finding a new place to live, to packing, cleaning and buying supplies, there is a great deal to organize if you want to get from Point A to Point B successfully.

Luckily, your moving preparations don’t have to be disorganized, chaotic or stressful. How, you ask? One way is to devise a smart and foolproof labeling system for packing. Below you will find our top tips for labeling moving boxes for an upcoming move.

Create a Color-Code System

We previously mentioned a color-code system. Now we will discuss in full what this is and how it works. So here goes! The best way to label moving boxes is to create and use a color-coding system. Here’s an example:

Say you choose the color blue to mean bedroom. You will use either a blue marker or blue tape to label all boxes that are packed with items from your bedroom. Come moving day, you will know to take all boxes labeled with blue to the bedroom until they can later be unpacked.

How will others, like friends and movers, understand your color-coding system? A good way to keep them informed is to place colored pieces of paper on the doors of your new home that match the color-code on your boxes. For example, for bedroom boxes labeled with blue, place a blue piece of paper over that specific bedroom door.

Create a Number Labeling System

Are you into numbers more than colors? No problem! Another great labeling technique you can use is a number labeling system. The purpose of using numbers to mark your moving boxes is to designate a certain number to each container. Then, you create a master inventory checklist that includes the contents located in each numbered box.

For example: If Box #1 includes a coffee maker, toaster and blender, each of these items will be listed under Box #1 on your inventory checklist. Then, on the box, you will write “#1”.

The key to using a number labeling system is to ensure you don’t lose the master inventory checklist. So print several copies and also email it to yourself and even to a friend for extra backup.

Gather Labeling Supplies

One of the keys to successfully pack for a move is to have the proper supplies to get the job done. While the most obvious supplies you’ll need are things like cardboard moving boxes, packing paper, bubble wrap, and tape, you will also need labeling supplies:

Quality Markers. One of the most important labeling supplies to have are markers (have several on hand!). Unlike ordinary pens, markers are the best choice. When shopping for markers, keep these things in mind:

Color. Using markers of different colors will allow you to color-code each box based on the room it belongs in. This will make moving day, and unpacking, much more organized.

Quality. With moving costs exploding around you, it can be tempting to cut costs on things like markers. But this is a definite mistake, as they are more likely to run out of ink faster and not show up as well.

Permanent and Waterproof. Moving day comes with a big list of what-ifs. What if it rains? What if something leaks? Problems like these can cause labels to smudge and smear. This is why using permanent and waterproof markers when labeling your moving boxes is a must.

Labels. If you prefer to have sticky labels that you write on, you can find downloadable and ready-to-use printable moving box labels on the Internet. You can also purchase labels from a local moving company. These labels will include the names of different rooms on them so you won’t even have to write on them.

Colored Tape. While packing your belongings, you will have lots of clear packing tape on hand. But this won’t work for labeling! To label your boxes, you will need to purchase colored tape. This way, you can enhance your labeling system and make box notification easier.

Label Boxes Correctly

There are, of course, no serious rules to follow when it comes to labeling your moving boxes. You are a unique individual, after all, and can label them whichever way you choose. But we do have a few proven techniques to share with you to help make labeling an easy and organized success.

  • Choose a labeling method that works best for you. Then, label the top and two sides of each moving box. Be sure your writing is legible. It should also be visible on at least one side, even when boxes are stacked one on top of the other.
  • Attach moving labels to your boxes then place clear packing tape over them. This way labels won’t fall of or get torn or wet during transportation.
  • Label boxes that require extra care with words like “Fragile”, “Breakable” or “Handle with Care”.

For everything you need to know about moving, click here!

Simple Steps to Packing Your Book Collection

During the stressful and chaotic process of moving house, packing books isn’t typically put on the high-priority list of things to get done. It’s understandable. Packing books, after all, is much easier than packing, say, a kitchen that is full of breakable items. But while books require a less tedious packing process than some other belongings, you don’t just want to throw them in a box and hope for the best. Instead, you need to know the basic principles and safety rules of packing them to ensure they make it to your new home unharmed. To prevent damage to your favorite reads and to prolong their shelf life, here are some simple steps to follow when packing your book collection.

Step 1: Sort.

A handful of books may not seem like much weight. But the more books you cram into a box, the heavier the load will become. The number one problem people make when packing books for a move is putting too many in one box. This can cause many problems on moving day, such as personal injury or a box breaking. The biggest problem, though, is this: The final price of your move is based on the total weight of your shipment. This means that the heavier your boxes are, the more costly your move will be.

So consider this: Do you really need to take every book you own? If you take the time to go through your book collection, you will most likely come across many that you no longer want or feel the desire to hold onto. Consider giving these books to a friend who loves to read, or donating them to a library, school or charity shop. You can also recycle any paperbacks that are too worn-out or damaged to be given away.

Step 2: Gather Supplies.

In order to pack your books, you will need to have the right packing supplies to avoid any damage during transport. Here’s what you’ll need:

Book boxes. Wimpy boxes won’t work when packing your books, so you’ll need to collect book boxes that can handle the job. Book boxes are

  1. Strong, because they are made out of thick cardboard.
  2. Small-medium in size (20” x 11” x 11”).
  3. Clean, dry and free of pre-existing damage.

Packing paper. Soft packing paper is a must-have supply when packing your book collection. Use it to separate rows of books arranged inside your boxes and to fill empty spots to prevent rattling during shipment.

Packing tape. Heavy boxes have an increased risk of breaking. This is why strong, high-quality packing tape is so important. You will need to use it to seal your boxes, but also to provide additional reinforcement on their bottom and sides.

Permanent marker. Be sure to use a permanent marker to label each box of books. This will make things easier when arriving at your new home.

Step 3: Pack them.

When packing your books, there are three different methods you can choose to arrange them: upright, flat and spine down. The safest method is to lie them flat in a box in stacks. If you choose this method, be sure to place heavier books on the bottom and lighter ones on top. When you have sorted through your book collection and have collected the necessary packing supplies, you can finally take the steps to pack them.

  • Individually wrap any valuable books you have in soft packing paper.
  • Line the bottom of your boxes with packing paper to further insulate it. This will provide them with extra protection during the move.
  • Don’t arrange books too tightly. This could cause damage to covers and pages.
  • Don’t let the pages or covers of different books directly touch each other. To do this, pack one row of books then place a couple of sheets of packing paper over them. Then pack the next row of books.
  • Fill any large gaps inside your boxes with crumpled pieces of packing paper to eliminate movement.
  • Place a final sheet of packing paper on the very top of your books. Then close the lid and secure it with tape.
  • Label your box with a permanent marker.

Safety Rules to Remember

The key to packing books is taking the necessary safety measures to pack and ship them. Avoiding any of the basic rules listed below when packing your books can result in damage.

  • Keep the weight of a single book-filled box under 40 pounds.
  • Use small- to medium-sized boxes.
  • Double tape the seams of your book boxes – even containers that are new.
  • Place the heaviest books on the bottom of each box.
  • Use extra care when packing books of value by wrapping them in soft packing paper. You may also want to transport books of high value (first-edition collections, etc.) yourself to ensure they are handled with utmost care.

For everything you need to know about your upcoming move, click here.