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Moving On April 30th from 3 bedroom in Hollywood

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Why do people choose ABC Movers as their #1 moving services provider in Castaic?

Castaic, California (also Cas•te•Ic, or Kashtiq), is a rural unincorporated community located in the northern part of Los Angeles County, California. Many thousands of motorists pass through Castaic daily as they drive to or from Los Angeles onInterstate 5. Castaic Lake is part of the California Water Project and is the site of a hydro-electric power plant. Castaic is located approximately 40 miles (64 km) northwest of the downtown Los Angeles Civic Center and about 10 miles (16 km) north of the city of Santa Clarita, California.

History

The origin of the name Castec is the Chumash Native American word Kashtiq, meaning "eyes." Castec is first mentioned on old boundary maps of Rancho San Francisco, as a canyon at the trailhead leading to the old Chumash camp at Castac Lake (Tejon Ranch). Modern Castaic began in 1887 when Southern Pacific set up a railroad siding, naming it "Castaic Junction."Between January and April of 1890, the Castec School District assumed that new spelling, Castaic. Between 1890 and 1916, the Castaic Range War was fought in Castaic country over ranch boundaries and grazing rights. It was the biggest range war in U.S. history. A feud started over Section 23, where the Stonebridge subdivision is now. William Chormicle had legally bought the property, but William "Wirt" Jenkins was already storing grain on it and said he had filed for ownership. During a heated dispute, Chormicle and a friend shot and killed two of Jenkins's cowhands. They were acquitted in court. However, Jenkins was the local Justice of the Peace with friends of his own, and the feud quickly grew into war. Former Los Angeles Rangers (with whom Jenkins had fought) and other notables were drawn in. The war claimed dozens of lives and foiled a negotiator, a forest ranger whom President Theodore Roosevelt had sent in to quell it.

 

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